Stuart Masson

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,298 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Purchase of faulty secondhand car. #123746
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Bob. If you are rejecting the car under the Consumer Rights Act within the first 30 days, you are entitled to a full refund unless the car has been damaged.

    A dealer cannot sell you a car marked “spares or repairs” or “trade sale” or anything similar unless the car is not going to be driven, as it’s strictly for unroadworthy cars. For more information, have a read of our article about dirty dealer tricks.

  • in reply to: Faulty brand new car (SEAT Ateca) #123742
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Debbie. Unfortunately, intermittent problems are difficult to diagnose as they may not appear when the technician tests the vehicle. You say that it happened three times in 20 days, which is roughly once a week – they are not going to drive the car for a week to wait for it to maybe happen again.

    You are definitely entitled to ask what exactly they have done to “fix” the fault. If they have changed sensors or cameras, it may have fixed the problem. But without knowing what is causing it, there will always be an element of trial and error.

    If you are unhappy with the way the dealer is treating the issue, you can always make a complaint to SEAT head office at Milton Keynes, who may be more responsive in helping.

  • in reply to: Can I reject a car after 6 months? #123740
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Rachel. The Consumer Rights Act gives a buyer advantages if they are trying to reject a car within the first six months. After that time, you are still able to reject a vehicle but the law isn’t really on your side and the seller is favoured.

    Given that you bought a brand-new car, your best bet may be to go directly to Land Rover head office if you are not getting satisfactory results from the dealer.

  • in reply to: Which to buy? BMW X5 vs Nissan Juke #123738
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Ian. They are very different cars, so you are comparing apples with oranges there.

  • in reply to: Will taking out a PCP affect my chances of remortgaging #123737
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Stephen. It will certainly be a consideration in your mortgage application. Among all the things that the mortgage provider will consider will be both your total debt and your monthly incomings/outgoings.

    I would have thought that, ignoring the rest of your financial situation, it shouldn’t end up making a massive difference to your mortgage application. If you were taking on a second car finance agreement in addition to your existing car, that would be a different story.

  • in reply to: Excessive oil consumption (Vauxhall Zafira) #123736
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi David. A 10-year-old car with nearly 90,000 miles on the clock will be difficult to reject if it is running properly. Yes, it is a high level of oil consumption, but rejecting the car under the Consumer Rights Act as not fit for purpose could well be difficult.

  • in reply to: 2nd year of PCP Servicing,V.Low mileage. #123504
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Personally, I’d be servicing it with Toyota to keep my options open.

    There’s no reason you can’t call the Toyota dealer and ask them to match the price of servicing it elsewhere. They may not match it, but they might go some way to reducing the current gap.

  • in reply to: Out of warranty PCP (Volkswagen Polo) #123503
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Ken. If the car has a full Volkswagen service history, you can try and push for some goodwill payment to cover the costs. I’d also scour any owners’ forums to see if anyone has had the same problem – it may be a known issue for that model.

    If you don’t get any joy with either of those approaches, your wallet is probably going to be £2,000 lighter.

  • in reply to: 2nd year of PCP Servicing,V.Low mileage. #123274
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi David. If you plan on giving the car back to the finance company at the end of the agreement, you need to have complied with the contractual requirements for servicing. That means paying for a full service – at a Toyota dealer – if that’s what the book says. If you don’t, the finance company will charge you for breaching your contract and it will almost certainly be much more than £295.

    If you don’t plan on giving the car back (ie – you plan to either pay off the balloon and keep it, or you plan to part-exchange the car at a dealership and are banking on the car being worth more than the balloon/GFV), then you don’t need to have it serviced according to the book and your finance contract.

    For more information, have a read of our article about servicing your car when you have a PCP.

  • in reply to: PCP – cancellation rights #123748
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi David. It all depends on whether a) the contract says anything about the finance agreement still being in place when the service is due, and b) how efficiently the finance/sales people communicate with the service people who set up the free servicing agreements.

    The “cancel after two months” thing is a lie. That is simply because if you cancel before that, the dealer and the salespeople won’t get paid their commission on selling you finance. You can cancel anytime, and it’s better if you do it within the first 14 days.

  • in reply to: PCP – cancellation rights #123747
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Nathan. Never rely on verbal assurances, always get them in writing. Right now, you have no proof that you are entitled to cancel the purchase if the finance offer is not as favourable as you would like.

  • in reply to: Help: What are my rights.? #123745
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Louise. If you have formally rejected the car (which should be in writing rather than verbally) and the dealer refuses to accept your rejection, you will need to bring action against him – which usually means legal action. I would suggest talking to a lawyer to maximise your chances of success.

  • in reply to: Our new car is not as described #123507
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Stephanie. Not fit for purpose is a subjective allegation, so you need to have considerable evidence to support your claim. I would suggest you get professional legal advice before pushing to reject the car under the Consumer Rights Act.

  • Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Deborah. A PCP is a form of HP agreement, which is why your paperwork says HP.

    The finance company will always tell you that you need to pay excess mileage. However, the legal community is of the majority opinion that they can’t enforce that, and finance companies will not go to court as they know they will almost certainly lose.

  • Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Mark. You are probably outside the six-month window for rejecting the car with the support of the Consumer Rights Act, although it depends how long the car has been back with the dealership on its various repair attempts (since that time doesn’t count). you should contact your finance company first, as they have to approve your rejection (it’s their car, not yours).

    If you are able to reject the vehicle under the Consumer Rights Act, you won’t get 100% of your initial price back because the dealer is entitled to reduce the refund based on your use of the vehicle during your ownership. The law does not specify how this is calculated, so its a matter of negotiation/argument.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,298 total)

Lost Password