Stuart Masson

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,263 total)
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  • in reply to: What to look for when buying an older Renault Clio #120129
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Cosmo. At this price level, there are always a million things that could be a problem on any car, and they are not always visible on a test drive or casual inspection.

    The most important thing is to see the car’s service history and have a good, long, hard look at the car’s condition.

    You should insist that the car passes an MOT test before you pay for it, otherwise it’s basically a ‘spares and repairs’ car only. If the dealer is not prepared to have the car tested, it’s a bad sign.

  • in reply to: Fault with new SEAT Ateca on PCP #120126
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Mark. Rejecting a car for a rattle would probably be difficult, even though it’s a new car.

    If you are able to reject the car now, you would be eligible for a refund of any deposit plus any monthly payments made, minus a charge for wear and tear. This is not a clearly-defined amount, so would be a matter of negotiation.

  • in reply to: Car not moved for months (Chevrolet Lacetti) #120124
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Les. If the smoke does not go away after a short while, I’d be taking it to get professionally looked at.

  • in reply to: AEB faulty – Hyundai i30 #120114
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Paul. It’s quite possible that the camera is not being cleaned by the wipers, as the cluster of camera and radar units is up the top of the windscreen in front of the rear-view mirror so it may be missed as the wiper sweeps across the windscreen.

    If the official line from Hyundai is that the fault cannot be fixed, then you would seem to have two choices: 1) manually clean the windscreen on a regular basis to stop the camera from being obscured; or 2) reject the car as not fit for purpose.

    Rejecting the vehicle via the Consumer Rights Act as not fit for purpose is usually pretty difficult, especially if the problem is a known design issue rather than a one-off fault. In any case, you would need to formally reject the vehicle in writing. Because you have had it for four months, the dealer would be entitled to one attempt to fix the problem (any work already done does not count). if they can’t fix the problem, you are entitled to finally reject the vehicle.

    Sensors and cameras are becoming more and more common on new cars, and having them obscured by debris is therefore becoming a common problem as well. I don’t know if anyone has successfully rejected a car on this basis, but it would seem a tough argument to try and win.

  • in reply to: Mis-sold Diesel with DPF problems (Range Rover Evoque) #120112
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Jackie. Based on your description of your driving, I wouldn’t expect the DPF to be filling up and requiring manual regeneration in that time. It sounds like there may be a more fundamental problem with the vehicle.

  • in reply to: New car not running smoothly (Honda CR-V) #120107
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Andy. If it’s a new car, you will be covered by your new car warranty. No idea what the problem may be, but it’s probably not serious.

    Any Honda dealer (doesn’t have to be the one you bought it from) should be able to diagnose and fix it under warranty for you.

  • in reply to: Business Contract Hire agreement – faulty Land Rover #119729
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Ian. There’s a reason Land Rover is infamous for unreliability…

    Business use vehicles are not covered by the Consumer Rights Act, so the rights of the dealer to have the opportunity to resolve the problem are irrelevant.

    You’ve had the car a year now, so rejecting it will be difficult even though you have had ongoing problems with it. You can become the most annoying person in the world, spending all day chasing the dealer, the finance company, the manufacturer, Trading Standards, consumer affairs programmes, and bash out email after email until they eventually give in – or get a lawyer. Playing nicely is not likely to help you now.

  • in reply to: Cancelling a finance deal #119727
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Andrew. It’s not an odd situation; things like this happen all the time.

    If it’s a lease agreement, you will have to pay whatever penalties are in the contract for terminating early. There’s generally no other option available.

  • in reply to: Cancelling pcp 2 weeks after 14 day cooling off period #119723
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Dan. Even if you cancel your PCP agreement within the 14-day cooling-off period, it doesn’t mean you can hand the car back. The finance agreement is a separate contract from the car purchase.

    You can settle the finance agreement at any time, but chances are high that the settlement figure is going to be much higher than your car’s value. That means you will have to pay the difference out of your own savings, and it is likely to be thousands of pounds.

  • in reply to: Deposit taken #119722
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Aaron. Never give a car dealer your card details unless you want them to take money off it.

    Now you have a situation where you have clearly given them your details and are saying that you didn’t mean to do that. They can obviously argue that you knew exactly what you were doing, and there is no proof of anything.

    Have you actually asked the dealership for a refund of the deposit? They may agree it was a misunderstanding and refund the money immediately. Or you may have to fight them long and hard to get it back. You won’t know until you speak to them.

  • in reply to: Cancelling New Vehicle Order #119721
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Kieran. The first and most obvious thing is that your girlfriend should read a contract (or any piece of paper) before signing it.

    You should never need to sign anything to get a finance quote on a new car, so either the dealership is highly manipulative or you/your girlfriend are not telling the whole truth here.

    If she hasn’t paid any deposit then there’s not much the dealership can do. She can inform them that she’s not proceeding with any purchase, in writing (email is fine). They may jump up and down, but there’s not much else they can do.

  • in reply to: Fault with new van #119718
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Kate. If it’s a business use vehicle (which most vans are), you are not covered by the Consumer Rights Act for rejecting the vehicle.

    If it’s a new van with a clear-cut fault, you should be covered under the manufacturer’s new car warranty and a dealer should be happy to fix it as they can bill the manufacturer for whatever the problem is.

    In many cases, calling the manufacturer’s head office to lodge a formal complaint against the dealership tends to get things hurried along. Without being rude, become the most annoying person in the world and keep chasing the dealer and the manufacturer until they fix the problem. Unfortunately, it’s often the only way to get things moving.

  • in reply to: Deposit taken #120130
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Mon. For a proper finance application with Volkswagen Finance (which is the finance company used by almost every VW dealer on a new car), a Volkswagen dealership would generally have to provide the following to the finance company:
    – Your current home address and last three of history if you’ve moved in that time
    – Your current employment address, job title and last three years of history
    – Your current salary
    – Your bank details
    – a specific quote on a specific vehicle (including deposit, term, monthly payments, etc. as well as the vehicle specification)

    If you haven’t given the dealer this information, then they probably haven’t made a formal finance application and they’re lying.

    If you did give them all these details, plus a deposit as a commitment to buy a car, what did you think they were going to do with that information.

    If your concern is that the finance application was done on a non-existent car, then that ends up happening a lot – not by intention, but because there always thousands of people in VW dealerships up and down the country every day signing contracts and submitting finance applications. Often, two people will be trying to buy the same vehicle at the same time, and the dealer will only find out afterwards that someone else has gone and bought the same car 30 seconds earlier.

  • in reply to: Cancelling car lease order #119725
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Andy. You are outside the six-month window for rejecting the vehicle with the support of the Consumer Rights Act. You can potentially still reject the vehicle outside this window, especially if they have advised that defective parts were fitted, but you’ll need good legal assistance to help you with it.

  • in reply to: Cancelling car lease order #119724
    Stuart Masson
    Stuart Masson
    Keymaster

    Hi Megan. It will depend on what your contract says. Usually there is a clause about how long the dealer is allowed to delay you before you can cancel the contract and get your money back (usually about 28 days after the advised delivery date).

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